SGC Admin: From our inbox to you … Thanks for sharing Patti… 🙂 

Big hot gold sun  Stock Vector - 23547480
Copy Right: Larisa Kravets

From Patti Wigington, your Guide to Paganism / Wicca

Hard to believe the wheel of the year turns so fast, but Litha is rapidly approaching. Falling on June 21, this is the longest day of the year. It’s a time of celebration for cultures around the world, and the summer solstice has always been rich in folklore and tradition. Midsummer is a celebration of the sun and its power and energy, as well as of the summer harvest, as gardens come into bloom. Today, we’ll look at some of the customs and history behind the midsummer celebration.

Litha History

Nearly every agricultural society has marked the high point of summer in some way, shape or form. On this date – usually around June 21 or 22 (or December 21/22 in the southern hemisphere) – the sun reaches its zenith in the sky. It is the longest day of the year, and has been celebrated by everyone from the Celts to the Egyptians to the peoples of ancient Greece and Rome. Read More About Litha History

Honoring the Sun People have celebrated the sun for thousands of years.

One of the key themes of Litha is the power of the sun – after all, it’s the longest day of the year, with more hours of daylight than any other. People have been honoring the energy of the sun for a long time – be sure to read about:

Ra, the Sun God
Sun Worship
The Sun Dance

Legends and Folklore

No matter where you live, or what you call it, chances are you can connect to a culture that honoured a sun deity around this time of year. Let’s look at some of the gods and goddesses from around the world that are connected with the summer solstice, as well as some of the traditions and folklore associated with Litha.

Deities of the Summer Solstice
Litha Folklore and Customs
Setting up Your Litha Altar

Patti Wigington
Paganism / Wicca Guide

Contact Information:
1500 Broadway, 6th Floor
New York, NY, 10036

© 2014 About.com

Please feel free to comment on our posts:

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s