From our inbox to you from: Patti Wigington & Making Magic in Your Garden


Making Magic in Your Garden
By Patti Wigington
 

The garden can be one of the most magical places in your life. As spring approaches, let’s look at how to plan, create, and grow your magical garden, as well as ways to create specialty gardens, herb plots, and more!

Garden Folklore and Magic

The very act of planting, of beginning new life from seed, is a ritual and a magical act in itself. To cultivate something in the black soil, see it sprout and then bloom, is to watch a magical working unfold before our very eyes. The plant cycle is intrinsically tied to so many earth-based belief systems that it should come as no surprise that the magic of the garden is one well worth looking into.

Plant a Magical Moon Garden

 

A lot of people don’t realize you can grow plants and flowers that bloom at night. Cultivating a moon garden is a great way to get in touch with nature, and it provides a beautiful and fragrant backdrop for your moonlight rituals in the summer. If you plant these lovelies close to your house, you can open the windows and take advantage of their aromas as you sleep.

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As spring arrives, our gardens begin to bud and eventually bloom. For hundreds of years, the plants that we grow have been used in magic. Flowers in particular are often connected with a variety of magical uses. Now that spring is here, keep an eye out for some of these flowers around you, and consider the different magical applications they might have. 

Magical Flower Correspondences

 

SGC: From our inbox to you; “Celebrating the Sabbat, March 20 By Patti Wigington”

 

 

 

Celebrating the Sabbat, March 20
By Patti Wigington

Spring has finally arrived! March has roared in like a lion, and if we’re really lucky, it will roll out like a lamb. Meanwhile, on or around March 20th, we have Ostara to celebrate. It’s the time of the vernal equinox if you live in the Northern Hemisphere, and it’s a true marker that Spring has come.            There are many different ways you can celebrate this Sabbat, depending on your tradition.

May your Sabbat be a magical one!

Rituals to Celebrate the Spring Equinox

Depending on your particular tradition, there are many different ways you can celebrate Ostara, but typically it is observed as a time to mark the coming of Spring and the fertility of the land. By watching agricultural changes — such as the ground becoming warmer, and the emergence of plants from the ground — you’ll know exactly how you should welcome the season. Here are a few rituals you may want to think about trying — and remember, any of them can be adapted for either a solitary practitioner or a small group, with just a little planning ahead.

Setting up your Ostara Altar: Try these tips to set up your altar for the Spring Equinox.
Ostara Altar Photo Gallery: Be sure to check out some of our readers’ photos of their Ostara altars – and find some inspiration!
Ostara Ritual for Solitaries: This simple ritual is designed with the solo practitioner in mind.
The Lesser Banishing Ritual of the Chocolate Rabbit: This fairly ridiculous Ostara rite for kids is silly fun for the whole family.
Ostara Rebirthing Ritual: Celebrate the season of rebirth and renewal with this rite.
Ostara Labyrinth Meditation: This meditation ritual will help you with some problem solving during the Ostara season.
Earth Meditation: As the earth begins to warm back up, use this meditation to help get yourself grounded.
Celebrating Ostara with Kids: Got little Pagans? Here are some great ways to include them in your Ostara celebrations!

Ostara Customs and Traditions
Interested in learning about some of the traditions behind the celebrations of March? Learn why St. Patrick hated snakes, and why the Easter bunny brings eggs for us to eat!
Ostara History: The vernal equinox has a long magical history. Here’s how it’s been celebrated through time.
Deities of Ostara: Meet some of the gods and goddesses associated with the spring equinox.
Spring Equinox Celebrations Around the World: Pagans aren’t the only ones celebrating this time of year – here’s what the rest of the world is doing!
Who was Eostre?: Was Eostre really an ancient goddess of spring?
Matronalia, March 1: The Romans celebrated an early version of Mother’s Day at the beginning of March.
Easter Eggs: Pagan or Not?: Are Easter Eggs secretly Pagan?
Can You Really Balance an Egg on the Equinox? Have you ever heard about balancing an egg on the equinox? Let’s look at the science behind the rumor.
Beware the Ides of March!: The Ides of March were an unlucky day for a certain Roman emperor.
St. Patrick and the Snakes: There’s a lot of speculation on whether or not the snakes were a metaphor for Pagans – did St. Patrick really drive them out of Ireland?
Pagans and Lent: Should Pagans give things up for Lent, just because their Christian friends and family members are?

Ostara Crafts & Recipes

As Ostara rolls in, you can decorate your home (and keep your kids entertained) with a number of easy craft projects. Start celebrating a bit early with a St. Patrick’s Day Snake Wreath or a basket of naturally-dyed eggs. If you’re thinking about planning a feast, be sure to check out these recipe ideas!

From our inbox to you, From Patti Wigginton on: Handfasting

SGC Admin: Yep it`s getting to that time of the year when it`s most popular for “tying the knot`… If you have ever wondered what goes into the Pagan celebration of hand-fasting (or getting married) check out Patti`s article below… 🙂 

Hands tied with ribbon at wedding hand fasting ceremony Stock Photo - 3337510

Handfasting Season is Here!
Looking for information on how to hold a Pagan handfasting ceremony? Here’s where we’ve got it all covered, from the origins of handfastings to jumping the broom to selecting your cake! Also, be sure to learn about magical handfasting favors to give your guests, how to make sure you’ll have a magical ceremony, and who can actually perform your handfasting!

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Patti Wigington
Paganism/Wicca Expert
Handfasting History: An Old Tradition Made New  
Handfasting was common centuries ago in the British Isles, and then vanished for a while. Now, however, it’s seeing a rising popularity among Pagan couples who are interested in tying the knot. Many Pagan couples choose to have a handfasting ritual instead of a traditional wedding ceremony. READ NOW
Handfasting Tips: How to Have a Magical Ceremony  
Spring is here, and love is in the air! For many people of Pagan faiths, this is the time of year for a handfasting ceremony. If you’re lucky enough to have someone you love this much, there are a few things you may want to keep in mind while planning your handfasting ceremony. READ NOW
Handfasting Favors: Magical Gifts for Your Guests  
t’s become traditional to give each of your guests a small wedding favor. Typically, these are small trinkets with either the date of the event or the couples’ names on them. However, if you’re having a Pagan or Wiccan handfasting, rather than a traditional wedding ceremony, why not come up with an idea that celebrates your spiritual path, as well as announcing your commitment to the community? READ NOW
Who Can Perform a Handfasting?  
Handfastings are becoming more and more popular, as Pagan and Wiccan couples are seeing that there is indeed an alternative for non-Christians who want more than just a courthouse wedding. A common question among Pagans is that of who can actually perform the handfasting ceremony itself? READ NOW
More About Handfasting  
Wondering about jumping the broom, handfasting bonfire safety, deities of marriage, and how to choose the perfect cake? We’ve got it all here, including a sample ceremony template that you can use!

How to Choose Your Handfasting Cake
Jumping the Broom: A Besom Wedding
Handfasting Bonfires: What You Need to Know
Deities of Marriage and Love

Sample Handfasting Ceremony Template
Handfasting Basket (Thirteen Blessings)

READ NOW

 

About Paganism/Wicca 

Ritual tips for 2015 Lammas from Patti Wiginton

SGC Admin: We are re-posting the following from 2014 🙂

Blessed Lammas to you from SGC

From our inbox to you… Check out rituals for the upcoming Lammas with Patti Wigington 

 

Have you started planning your Lammas rituals yet?

Depending on your individual spiritual path, there are many different ways you can celebrate Lammas, but typically the focus is on either the early harvest aspect, or the celebration of the Celtic god Lugh. It’s the season when the first grains are ready to be harvested and threshed, when the apples and grapes are ripe for the plucking, and we’re grateful for the food we have on our tables.

Here are a few rituals you may want to think about trying — and remember, any of them can be adapted for either a solitary practitioner or a small group, with just a little planning ahead.

 

Lugnasadh  Lammas  greeting card Stock Vector - 13565300
Copyright : Belyaev Viacheslav

Set Up Your Lammas Altar

August 1 is known as Lammas, or Lughnasadh. This is a day to celebrate the beginnings of the harvest, when the grain and corn is gathered. It’s also a time, in some traditions, of honoring Lugh, the Celtic craftsman god. Here are some ideas for dressing up your altar for your Lammas (Lughnasadh) celebration! Setting Up Your Lammas Altar

Breaking bread close up Stock Photo - 29135419
Copyright : belchonock

Lammas Bread Sacrifice Ritual

Lammas is a time of celebrating the beginning of the harvest, a theme seen often in the sacrifice of the grain god. Make a sacrifice of your own this Lammas, with this bread ritual that marks the beginning of the harvest. Lammas Bread Sacrifice Ritual

http://www.tarotguidingyou.co.uk189 × 267

Ritual to Honor Lugh the Craftsman

August 1 is known in many Pagan traditions as Lammas, and is a celebration of the early harvest. However, in some paths, it’s a day to honor Lugh, the Celtic god of craftsmanship. Celebrate your own talents and skills on Lughnasadh by honoring Lugh with a rite that can be held for a group or a solitary practitioner. Ritual to Honor Lugh of the Many Skills

spiritblogger.wordpress.com

Lammas Harvest Ritual

Lammas is the early harvest Sabbat, and celebrates the crops of late summer and early autumn. If you wish to honor the Harvest Mother aspect of the Goddess and celebrate the cycle of life and rebirth, hold this Lammas rite either with a group or as a solitary practitioner. Hold a Lammas Harvest Ritual

Ritual tips for 2014 Lammas from Patti Wiginton

SGC Admin: From our inbox to you… Check out rituals for the upcoming Lammas with Patti Wigington 

Have you started planning your Lammas rituals yet?

Depending on your individual spiritual path, there are many different ways you can celebrate Lammas, but typically the focus is on either the early harvest aspect, or the celebration of the Celtic god Lugh. It’s the season when the first grains are ready to be harvested and threshed, when the apples and grapes are ripe for the plucking, and we’re grateful for the food we have on our tables.

Here are a few rituals you may want to think about trying — and remember, any of them can be adapted for either a solitary practitioner or a small group, with just a little planning ahead.

 

Lugnasadh  Lammas  greeting card Stock Vector - 13565300
Copyright : Belyaev Viacheslav

Set Up Your Lammas Altar

August 1 is known as Lammas, or Lughnasadh. This is a day to celebrate the beginnings of the harvest, when the grain and corn is gathered. It’s also a time, in some traditions, of honoring Lugh, the Celtic craftsman god. Here are some ideas for dressing up your altar for your Lammas (Lughnasadh) celebration! Setting Up Your Lammas Altar

Breaking bread close up Stock Photo - 29135419
Copyright : belchonock

Lammas Bread Sacrifice Ritual

Lammas is a time of celebrating the beginning of the harvest, a theme seen often in the sacrifice of the grain god. Make a sacrifice of your own this Lammas, with this bread ritual that marks the beginning of the harvest. Lammas Bread Sacrifice Ritual

http://www.tarotguidingyou.co.uk189 × 267

Ritual to Honor Lugh the Craftsman

August 1 is known in many Pagan traditions as Lammas, and is a celebration of the early harvest. However, in some paths, it’s a day to honor Lugh, the Celtic god of craftsmanship. Celebrate your own talents and skills on Lughnasadh by honoring Lugh with a rite that can be held for a group or a solitary practitioner. Ritual to Honor Lugh of the Many Skills

spiritblogger.wordpress.com

Lammas Harvest Ritual

Lammas is the early harvest Sabbat, and celebrates the crops of late summer and early autumn. If you wish to honor the Harvest Mother aspect of the Goddess and celebrate the cycle of life and rebirth, hold this Lammas rite either with a group or as a solitary practitioner. Hold a Lammas Harvest Ritual